East Keswick’s BIG trees

Inspired by Ian Rotherham’s talk on Ancient Woodlands (see next post) we have been measuring some of the village’s oldest trees. These will go into a national database at www.ancient-tree-hunt.org.uk/project/hunt. The village hosts many large and ancient trees, mainly Oak and Ash.

This veteran Ash near the green bridge down at the river has a circumference of 4.63m at shoulder height

 

Measuring the circumference of a massive Oak along the boundary of Ox Close wood. It measured 4.27m.

The Trust starts its 25th Anniversary

At our AGM in May, the Trust commenced its 25 Years Anniversary. Professor Ian Rotherham gave a talk on Ancient Woodlands to which the village History Group were invited… our first combined event.

The AGM in May, 2017 started our 25 Year’s Anniversary.

During the afternoon before the AGM, members of the Trust and the History Group accompanied Ian through Ox Close wood where given an enlightening aspect of the history of the wood. The rainy conditions did not dampen anyone’s enthusiasm!

Looking at Ox Close Wood with a different perspective

Bridleway chaos

During March, the bridleway down to the river was re-surfaced. The spoil that this work generated has been tipped to the sides of the bridleway and as a consequence has covered locally uncommon species of wild flowers. The Trust met up with the Footpath Officer (Groundwork) and the Parish Council to discuss this and other damage that was caused.

Spoil covering where Black Horehound grows which, locally, is very uncommon

Spoil at the side of the re-surfaced bridleway

Duke of Burgundy Butterfly

During March, a group of Trust volunteers visited some Duke of Burgundy butterfly sites to do a bit of habitat maintenance. The food plants of this butterfly are Primroses and Cowslips. Scrub was cleared to allow light to penetrate to the ground to allow these plants, primroses in particular, to thrive.

Habitat management for the Duke of Burgundy butterfly

Following this work members, along with other conservationists, returned in May to see the fruits of their labours and were rewarded with sightings of twenty adult Duke of Burgundy butterflies. Other butterflies seen were five Dingy Skippers, a Small Copper and a Red Admiral.

Robert Parkes organised a site visit to see the Duke of Burgundy Butterfly

An Event with Flora Locale

Flora Locale leaflet  minimizedOn Wednesday 13th July, the Trust is hosting a workshop for Flora Locale with the purpose of “Managing woodlands to improve biodiversity and sustainability”.

If you wish to attend, it is essential to book. For further information go to the Training section of www.floralocale.org alternatively email at info@floralocale.org.

Meet initially at Greenfields.

Bat Evening in Ox Close Wood

On Monday 18th May we surveyed the bats in Ox Close Wood. Our bat expert, who is a consultant ecologist, brought a number of bat detectors so that we could all have a go at listening to and deciphering the calls that we heard. Four bat species were identified during the evening; Daubenton’s, Noctule and Common and Soprano Pipistrelle. The river was a particularly rewarding area where nearly all the bats were seen and heard. A couple of the bat detectors could record calls and further species may be identified when these recordings are analysed over the next few days.

A few of the Trust members who attended the bat evening.... surrounded by Daubenton's bats!

A few of the Trust members who attended the bat evening…. surrounded by Daubenton’s bats!

Two more bat evenings are planned for the 17th and 24th June when different areas of the parish will be surveyed. If you would like to come; meet at the church on Moor Lane at 9.30pm. or contact 01937 574140.

Successful Mammal Trapping

Over the weekend of the 3rd, 4th and 5th October the Trust hosted a small-mammal trapping session by the Yorkshire Mammal Group. As with last October’s weekend, the target species were Water Shrew and Harvest Mouse. 50 traps were laid during each evening of the 3rd and 4th October in grassy areas alongside East Keswick Beck upstream of the East Keswick Marsh. All the traps were checked on the mornings of 4th and 5th October and although neither of the target species was trapped the total number of mammals caught was surprisingly good.

Over the two nights, 29 Wood Mice, 18 Bank Voles, 5 Field Voles and 3 Common Shrews were caught. After being weighed and sexed, all animals were safely returned, unharmed, to their point of capture.

A Field Vole just before release

A Field Vole just before release

A mouse is safely returned home

A mouse is safely returned home

 

 

 

 

 

 

To see the Harvest Mouse that was caught last year, please scan down to view the post from October 2013.