Upcoming Events

Artwork for Sale

One of our members, Jinny Casey, enjoys painting and offers some of her, and other, work for sale here. They are all original works of art of animals, plants and landscapes and are framed. Each piece is priced at £20.00 and all donations will go to the Trust.

Jinny advises that she could deliver locally and suggests that the donation be put in an envelope for her collection during delivery.

If you are interested, please contact info@ekwt.org.uk





“Fox”. Pastel by Jinny Casey. 12 x 12 in (305 x 305mm)
“Dartmoor Landscape”. Pastel by Jinny Casey. 14 x 12 in (355 x 305mm)
“Penquins”. Pastel by Jinny Casey. 15.5 x 12.5 in (390 x 317mm)
“Summer Border”. Pastel by Jinny Casey. 14 x 12.5 in (355 x 317mm)
“Roses”. Watercolour by Jean Easmond. 13 x 16 in (330 x 410mm)
“Otter”. Print by Lake District artist S.J. Rollo. 16 x 13 in (406 x 330mm)

Return of a Favourite

After not being seen in the area for six or seven years, we thought that the Wall butterfly had become extinct locally. Their numbers throughout the UK have declined rapidly over several recent decades and they now have a High Conservation Priority. Their decline is likely being caused by climate change…. it is thought that warmer summers are causing them to start an additional brood which is laid too late for their under-developed larvae to survive autumn and winter.

So how lovely it was to see their return with quite a few adult butterflies being seen in and around Ox Close Wood and on the way up to Woodhall.

Wall Butterfly

Another new butterfly for the parish this year has been the Dark Green Fritillary. It has been expanding through Yorkshire and had been seen ovipositing in Ox Close. Unfortunately we don’t yet have a good photo of this butterfly. But if you have….!

Recent Sightings

A short walk today into the wood and along the river found Goosanders, Grey Wagtails and a Jay. The Yellow Star of Bethlehem has been innundated during the recent floods but the patch of plants is growing well with quite a few flower buds showing. Other flora and fauna seen were….

Hibernating 7-Spot. Just a singleton. Sometimes they group together.
Violet
Primrose
Female Hazel flowers are just showing
Snowdrops are nearly over

Weekend Workparty

For those who are unable to join us on Fridays, on the Sundays of 1st December and 2nd February we will be holding Weekend Workparties. Families included.
Tasks will include hedge planting and making brash piles. Please bring a snack, gloves, suitable clothing and footwear.

Meet in Crabtree Lane car park at 10am. For further information, contact melanie@ekwt.org.uk

Another New Butterfly

The Brown Argus Aricia agestis is another new butterfly that Trust members have found in Ox Close Wood and in fields in East Keswick. This is great news – showing that the management of our reserves is being rewarded with these successes (see also Silver-washed Fritillary below). The caterpillars’ foodplant is usually Common Rock Rose but more recently they have started to use various geraniums including Meadow Cranesbill of which there is plenty in the parish.

Brown Argus
Brown Argus, underside.

Recent Sightings

Dead Man’s Fingers
Fluted Bird’s Nest fungus

Dead men’s fingers seen in Collingham.  We may think of fungi as an autumn phenomenon but they are present all year round… we often see St. George’s mushroom on the bluebell walk in Ox Close.  Here are two often overlooked summer fungi.  On the left is Dead Man’s Fingers Xylaria polymorpha which grows on dead wood and causes spalting;- the decorative black lines found in some wood.  On the right is the Fluted Bird’s Nest Cyathus striatus which tends to grow on soil with wood chip.  The “eggs” at the bottom of the nest are spore packets.  The cups have evolved so that raindrops shoot the spore packets up to a metre away.  They trail a sticky filament that catches on vegetation, ready for ingestion by herbivores and dispersal to new sites. Neither is very showy, but they are interesting!

New Butterfly for Ox Close Wood

The Silver-washed Fritillary (Argynnis paphia) has been seen for the first time by Trust members on 12th July ’19. Comparing the various photos that have been taken since then, there appear to be two males and a female. It’s likely that they have spread from colonies near Bramham. The butterfly recorder for VC64 advises that he has a record of one seen on two or three occasions last year – so this year’s sightings are not the first for the wood.

Silver-washed Fritillary (Argynnis paphia), a male showing the sex brands on its forewings.

Seen recently in the area

Common Green Shield Bug

This is a Common Green Shield Bug, Palomena prasina, laying eggs on a walnut leaf.  It used to be uncommon in Yorkshire – restricted to southern England – but has moved northwards. Despite its name this species is less often seen than the Hawthorn Shield Bug. Shield bugs are not beetles but are from the true bug family of insects, related to cicadas, pond skaters, leaf hoppers and aphids.

Summer Bird Survey

A small group, six adults and two children, made the usual tour of the parish looking for as many bird species as could be identified; both by sight and call.
It has been very noticeable that there have been very few Swallows this year. They migrate to Britain over the Sahara from South Africa and travel in daylight up to 200 miles a day.
Being such a small bird they are sensitive to changes and can be affected badly by storms, very dry or very wet conditions and food availability. Their reduced numbers have been been noted throughout Europe.
On the other hand, there were a good number of Wrens calling all around the parish. It’s likely that the relatively mild winter has aided their survival rate.

A total of 42 species were identified (in the order they were seen or heard)….

  • House Sparrow
  • Robin
  • Wood Pigeon
  • Red Kite
  • Starling
  • Lapwing
  • Blackbird
  • House Martin
  • Rook
  • Dunnock
  • Blue Tit
  • Swift
  • Magpie
  • Chaffinch
  • Chiff Chaff
  • Yellow Hammer
  • Wren
  • Crow
  • Buzzard
  • Pheasant
  • Long-tailed Tit
  • Tree Sparrow
  • Jackdaw
  • Greater Spotted Woodpecker
  • Swallow
  • Skylark
  • Lesser Whitethroat
  • Pied Wagtail
  • Mallard
  • Moorhen
  • Curlew
  • Green Woodpecker
  • Goldcrest
  • Goldfinch
  • Black-headed Gull
  • Song Thrush
  • Reed Bunting
  • Jay
  • Great Tit
  • Blackcap
  • Greenfinch
  • Coal Tit

The next (Winter) bird survey will take place in early 2020, the date of which will be arranged this Autumn. Keep an eye on Forthcoming Events above and in the next Newsletter.